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“Our environment, the world in which we live and work, is a mirror of our attitudes and expectations” – Earl Nightingale

If you are interested in finding out more about how this may be of interest to your school, I would be delighted to discuss possible ideas and come up with a plan that suits both your budget and your needs. I am currently based in Sligo but a consultation at your school can be discussed and may be accommodated.  I can also courier artwork directly to your school. I look forward to hearing from you,  

 

Julie Potter

Contact me at link below:

www.juliepotterart.com/contact

PREVIOUS WORK 

With my artistic background and dealing with discipline and various issues that arise in schools on a daily basis, I decided to do some research on the effects of school and classroom environments on behaviour. The information I found was both encouraging and fascinating.

 

A study done by ‘Sinofsky’ and ‘Knirck’ (1981) found that colour influences student attitudes, behaviours and learning. They cited the most important reasons for using colour effectively in learning environments included that colour affects a student's attention span and affects the student and teacher's sense of time. ‘Rice’ (1953) found that paint colour in schools, especially carefully planned colour schemes positively affects academic achievement of primary students. Papadatos (1973) suggested that the proper use of colour in schools can convert an atmosphere that is depressing and monotonous into one that is pleasing, exciting and stimulating. He concluded that such change in colour schemes in schools would reduce absenteeism and promote positive feelings about schools.

Ask a teacher what influences learning and you’ll get a variety of responses — primarily around teaching methods, curriculum and outside influences. It’s unlikely that you’ll hear ‘colour’ and ‘school design’ as a response. While the impact of colour and design is often unobserved, they are an inseparable part of our everyday lives. They are inherent in everything we see and do and studies indicate that they play a role in emotion, productivity, communication and learning. While the research is varied, it is conclusive; the use of colour and design can have a significant impact on emotion, which can ultimately influence an individual’s work and study.

 

In a recent article in ‘The Architects Journal,’ Carol Lees and Sharon Wright of Creative Wit make the case below for good school design:

‘Schools should be more than just functional spaces, they should inspire. Schools are communities, not just buildings. They are the places that convey the meaning and importance of learning. They could hardly be more important and correspondingly the role of excellent building design in improving schools should not be underestimated’

The Holistic Evidence and Design project summary published earlier this year by Professor Peter Barrett and his team concluded that the physical characteristics of a classroom impacted the learning progress of pupils by up to 16%. This study builds on the conclusions of the earlier 2010 Schools Environments Survey, which showed school environments have a positive impact on pupil behaviour and wellbeing in addition to the teachers’ ability to teach effectively.  Over 95% of the teachers agreed that the school environment had an influence on pupil behaviour.

 

If you are interested in finding out more about how this may be of interest to your school, I would be delighted to discuss possible ideas and come up with a plan that suits both your budget and your needs. 

 

Julie Potter

Contact me at link below:

www.juliepotterart.com/contact

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